Posted by: cindydyer | January 1, 2010

II Annual Winter Environmental Film Festival

Sponsored by Happy Tonics, Inc.

JANUARY
January 15 at 1 p.m.
— Lakeland Manor, 201 2nd Avenue, Shell Lake, Wisconsin. MicroCosmos, an environmental film about the little creatures that inhabit the earth will be shown. Film features beautiful close-up photography of a little known world. Open to residents and seniors. Refreshments will be served.

January 21 at 2 p.m. — Spooner Health System Activity Department, 819 Elm Street, Spooner, Wisconsin. Environmental Film: Incredible Journey of the Butterflies. Award-winning film by NOVA and shot in stunning detail. Open to residents and family.

January 22 at 5 p.m. — Friendship Commons, 118 4th Avenue, Shell Lake, Wisconsin. Pot luck supper served at 5 p.m. and Environmental Film: Incredible Journey of the Butterflies shown at 6 p.m. Bring something to share. Free will offering helps support Friendship Commons and the Monarch Butterfly Habitat in Shell Lake, Wisconsin. Open to the public.

January 28 — Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College, 13346 Trepania Road, Hayward, Wisconsin. Environmental film Flow to be shown. Fish meal and guest speaker. Film addresses global Indigenous water rights, water purity, privatization and pollution. Time and details to be announced. Open to the public.

FEBRUARY
February 11 at 2 p.m. — Spooner Health System Activity Department, 819 Elm Street, Spooner, Wisconsin. Environmental CD photos and talk on plants and butterflies at Monarch Butterfly Habitat. Open to residents and family.

February 12 at 1 p.m. — Lakeland Manor, 201 2nd Avenue, Shell Lake, Wisconsin. Environmental Film: America’s Lost Landscape. Event open to residents and seniors. Refreshments will be served.

February 18 — Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College, 13466 Trepania Road, Hayward, Wisconsin. Time and details to be announced. Film: King Corn. Event meal will feature native corn. Mary Ellen Ryall will speak on the Colonization of Maize.

February 26 at 5 p.m. — Friendship Commons, 118 4th Avenue, Shell Lake, Wisconsin. Pot luck supper at 5 p.m. and award-winning environmental film, America’s Lost Landscape, at 6 p.m. Bring something to share. Free will offering helps support Friendship Commons and Monarch Butterfly Habitat. Open to the public.

MARCH
March 11 at 7 p.m. — Barron County Master Gardeners, Old Courthouse, Barron, Wisconsin. Film: Risky Business. Mary Ellen Ryall will speak about pollinators including the monarch butterfly and butterfly-friendly gardens, plants and seeds. Open to members.

March 12, 2010, at 1 p.m. — Lakeland Manor, 201 2nd Avenue, Shell Lake, Wisconsin. Environmental Film: Incredible Journey of the Butterflies. Award winning film by NOVA and shot in stunning detail. Event open is to residents and seniors. Refreshments will be served.

March 15 at 6:30 p.m. — Northwood School, Route 53, Minong, Wisconsin. Films: Risky Business and Not for Sale. RSVP (715) 466-4692, Ext. 501. Open to the public. $3.00 per person.

March 18 at 2 p.m. — Spooner Health System Activity Department, 819 Elm Street, Spooner, Wisconsin. Film: In the Company of Wild Butterflies. Open to residents and family.

March 20 from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. – Northwood School, Route 53, Minong, Wisconsin. New Ventures Garden Seminar. Happy Tonics will be exhibiting on environmental education programs and the Monarch Butterfly Habitat in Shell Lake.

March 22 at 6:30 p.m. — Northwood School, Route 53, Minong, Wisconsin. Film: Incredible Journey of the Butterflies. RSVP (715) 466-4692, Ext. 501. $3.00 per person.

March 25 — Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College. Film: America’s Lost Landscape. Open to the public. Time, event meal and guest speaker to be announced.

March 26 — Pot Luck at 5 p.m. Film at 6 p.m. Friendship Commons, 118 4th Avenue, Shell Lake, Wisconsin. Film: Papalotiz: The Flight of the Monarch Butterfly. Free will offering helps support Friendship Commons and Monarch Butterfly Habitat. Open to the public.

REGISTRATION OR QUESTIONS: Call Mary Ellen Ryall (715) 468-2097 or email: maryellen@happytonics.org

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Responses

  1. I had my first bees last summer, using a topbar hive. The first thing that went wrong is the bees built their combs crosswise in the hive box, and I had to scrape them out and make them start over. Our summer is short here in New Mexico, and so they never seemed to get back to speed. The queen was not producing right, and the workers were not making honey. It was too late in the season to replace the queen and start over, so I gave the bees back to my teacher at Ecoversity in Santa Fe, and he combined them with his bees. I will start over this spring, but will use a Langstrom Hive.

    • Hi Sandra,

      Thanks for your perspective. Please let us know how the Langstrom Hive works out for you!


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